Enhanced PMP

Prescription Pills

Most states require checking their Prescription Monitoring Program database before prescribing controlled substances. This check provides valuable information. A patient may have prescriptions from other doctors or a history of drug use. Estimates vary, but 5-10% of the US – 15 to 30 million people – have some history of prescription drug abuse.

But this check isn’t easy.

First, we (or our medical assistant) needs to enter information manually into a website. Then we wait for a result. Then we get a report. This is a wall of text that looks like this.

PMP Image

Maybe the patient has multiple pages of history.

Now we need to analyze this and cross-reference it with the patient’s electronic medical record. This poses all kinds of problems.

  • Is the patient getting prescriptions from other practices?
  • Is the patient getting overlapping prescriptions?
  • Is the patient receiving high levels of opioids?
  • Is the patient building up a tolerance?
  • Is the patient doctor shopping?
  • Is the patient paying cash (possibly to avoid insurance audits)?

The list goes on. Given the fierce time demands of a clinical setting, checking every patient becomes very challenging. What’s important here?

PastRx does this better.

Our service automates time-consuming clerical work and retrieves reports for all your patients.

We bring in relevant additional data to provide a more complete picture including geolocational data on pharmacies, calculations of total morphine milligram equivalents / day and other relevant data.
The software does all the “stare and compare” tasks without getting board or distracted, and serves up alerts to clinicians.

PastRx highlights risks through these alerts, and the clinician can have evidence-based discussions with their patients to get the answers they need to provide informed decisions.

PastRx is an enhanced PMP – one that takes less time to use, provides better data, and gives you a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of your patient.

Imagine starting your day looking at something like this instead:

PastRx PMP Image

See how much easier it is to find patients with PMP risks?

Think about how often you can get to the important conversation with your patients about this. Prescription drug overdose is an epidemic – it’s the leading cause of accidental death and causes all kinds of other problems. PastRx gives you a way to stay on top of this that’s powerful and practical enough to do for all your patients.

Follow Prescription Advisory

When a clinician is prescribing a controlled substance, readily available information about the drugs that a patient is receiving from other providers can be a critically important component of the decision-making process…Increasingly, these [PDMP] programs have evolved into a useful tool for the clinician who must incorporate careful risk management into the prescribing of opioid analgesics or any other controlled substance.

Increasingly, these programs have evolved into a useful tool for the clinician who must incorporate careful risk management into the prescribing of opioid analgesics or any other controlled substance Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Serve a Vital Clinical Need.

Editorial  Pain Medicine, The American Academy of Pain Medicine; 2011;12:845

Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are now active in most states to assist clinicians in identifying potential controlled drug misuse, diversion, or excessive prescribing. Little is still known about the ways in which they are incorporated into workflow and clinical decision making, what barriers continue to exist, and how clinicians are sharing PDMP results with their patients.

Design
Qualitative data were collected through online focus groups and telephone interviews.

Setting
Clinicians from pain management, emergency and family medicine, psychiatry/behavioral health, rehabilitation medicine, internal medicine and dentistry participated.

Patients
Thirty-five clinicians from nine states participated.

Methods
We conducted two online focus groups and seven telephone interviews. A multidisciplinary team then used a grounded theory approach coupled with an immersion–crystallization strategy for identifying key themes in the resulting transcripts.

Results
Some participants, mainly from pain clinics, reported checking the PDMP with every patient, every time. Others checked only for new patients, for new opioid prescriptions, or for patients for whom they suspected abuse. Participants described varied approaches to sharing PDMP information with patients, including openly discussing potential addiction or safety concerns, avoiding discussion altogether, and approaching discussion confrontationally. Participants described patient anger or denial as a common response and noted the role of patient satisfaction surveys as an influence on prescribing.

Conclusion
Routines for accessing PDMP data and how clinicians respond to it vary widely. As PDMP use becomes more widespread, it will be important to understand what approaches are most effective for identifying and addressing unsafe medication use.

Pain Medicine, Volume 15, Issue 7, July 2014 
Share This
Prescription Advisory Systems & Technology

Request a PastRx Demo

We will contact you to arrange a demo at your convenience.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Prescription Advisory Systems & Technology

Contact PastRx

A representive will be in touch to answer any questions or concerns you might have.

Thank you! A Prescription Advisory representative will contact you shortly.